Monthly Archives: April 2019

NativeScript AndroidX support and Plugins

The next major version of NativeScript (version 6) will be switching from the android.support packages to the new androidx namespace. This will be a hard break; as you can only use the support api's or androidx api's; but not both. This is something Google has been implementing for a while; and NativeScript is getting on board to eliminate later issues and give us great support. The awesome developers at Progress have already created a fork of NativeScript; which you can install to test which uses androidx instead of using the support libraries.

Since one of my plugins is affected by the changes; I took a look into what was required to support both the current versions of NativeScript and the new upcoming version of NativeScript.

For any of you who have plugins; this code is what I basically devised.

let androidSupport=null;
if (android.support && android.support.v4) {
  androidSupport = android.support.v4;
} else if (global.androidx && global.androidx.core) {
  androidSupport = global.androidx.core;
}

Then you can use androidSupport to access the namespace, and it pretty much works the same as what you would access using android.support.v4 or the new androidx.core replacement. Because we used feature detection; this allows us to support both namespaces in the same code base.

So if you have JavaScript or TypeScript code that uses android.support.* then you can use this technique to make your plugin forwards compatible with the next major version of NativeScript while retaining support for the prior versions.

Here is a list of classses that are being moved from android support to androidx: https://developer.android.com/jetpack/androidx/migrate

VMWare Network Hickups ( sent link down event. )

I ran into this because I went to a hotel that had DHCP renew every 300 seconds, trying to download something inside the VM was getting clobbered...

If you check your syslog or kern.log and see the following entries; then I might have the solution for you:

kernel: [235397.022939] userif-3: sent link down event.
kernel: [235397.022943] userif-3: sent link up event.

Then the issue is one that when your DHCP renews it calls into the kernel with the new information; unfortunately this causes VMWare Workstation & Player (might effect other VMWare products?) to reset its network stack, even though nothing changed...

The solution after a lot of time googling different terms and trying to figure out what exactly was going on. I finally found it here (by Jan Just Keijer): https://www.nikhef.nl/~janjust/vmnet/ it was for an much older version of VMWare Player; but the solution still applies to VMWare workstation 15...

To make sure the information doesn't just disappear in the future (and so I can easily find it myself) I'm going to quote the relevant code and/or modifications I did..

Extract the /usr/lib/vmware/modules/source/vmnet-only.tar tar file, you need to modify the userif.c file. Search it for VNetUserIfSetUplinkState function and right after the variable declaration add if (!linkUp) return 0;

// Around line 966
VNetUserIfSetUplinkState(VNetPort *port, uint8 linkUp)
 {
    VNetUserIF *userIf;
    VNetJack *hubJack;
    VNet_LinkStateEvent event;
    int retval;

    /* ADD: never send link down events */   
    if (!linkUp) return 0;
    /* END Added code */
    
    ... rest of code ...

This will eliminate the linkdown events; which disconnect the internet from the VMWare network driver...

After you do that; recreate the vmnet-only.tar and replace the original. Then you can run: /usr/bin/vmware-modconfig --console --install-all

And then either
systemctl restart vmware
or
service vmware restart

If you still see " sent link down event." in your logs; then the patch wasn't applied properly.